News

Titles of the latest ASP publications

It's been quite some time since the Arch Street Project team has posted.  The COVID-19 pandemic has been very disruptive for all of us.  Initially all of our labs were closed.  Then, we were allowed to reopen but social distancing requirements prevented many of us from working with students in the manner that we had become accustomed. Now, more than 18 months later, our activity level is approaching something resembling normal.  However, despite COVID, the ASP team has still been plenty busy... Read More

Posted November 17, 2021 by Kimberlee Moran
Insect Pupa found on a human bone

Michael Monzon is a PhD student in the Department of Entomology at Rutgers - New Brunswick.  Michael is in the early stages of examining soil recovered from the body cavities of individuals recovered from Arch Street to see which, if any, insect remains are present and can be identified.  Modern archaeological investigations incorporate various types of physical evidence. Human burial sites provide a unique array of insect evidence for interpretation. This article is the second in a two-... Read More

Posted June 9, 2020 by Kimberlee Moran

Michael Monzon is a PhD student in the Department of Entomology at Rutgers - New Brunswick.  Michael is in the early stages of examining soil recovered from the body cavities of individuals recovered from Arch Street to see which, if any, insect remains are present and can be identified.  This article is the first in a two-part series on the intersection of Forensic Entomology and Archaeology.

Six-Legged Witnesses: Using Insect Evidence to Add Context to Archaeological... Read More

Posted October 10, 2019 by Kimberlee Moran
Femora with striated marks.

During the fall semester (Sept-Dec 2018), students from Bryn Mawr and Haverford helped to clean and catalog the remains at Rutgers-Camden as part of a praxis course led by Professor Maja Šešelj. The following post if from one such student  --- Bryn Mawr student James Frazier.  James is a senior at Bryn Mawr College who is majoring in anthropology with a thesis on the taphonomy of the Arch St. remains.​

 

Mystery Marks: An Exploration of Taphonomy... Read More

Posted February 11, 2019 by Kimberlee Moran
Dorsal view of adult sacrum from box RU-9 showing spina bifida

During the fall semester (Sept-Dec 2018), students from Bryn Mawr and Haverford helped to clean and catalog the remains at Rutgers-Camden as part of a praxis course led by Professor Maja Šešelj. The following post if from one such student  --- Bryn Mawr student Caitlin Smith.  Caitlin Smith is a senior at Bryn Mawr College who is majoring in anthropology with a thesis research focus in bioarchaeology.​

 

Spina Bifida in the Arch Street Population... Read More

Posted February 5, 2019 by Kimberlee Moran

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